Phaius wallichii ( tancarvilleae )

Phaius wallichii

Phaius Common names include greater swamp-orchid, swamp lily, swamp orchid, nun’s-hood orchid, nun’s orchid and veiled orchid.

Phaius is a genus of large, mostly terrestrial orchids (family Orchidaceae). The genus has about 43 species. These species are found in the tropical parts of the Old World: Africa (including Gabon, Congo, Uganda, Tanzania, etc.), Asia (India, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, etc.), New Guinea, Australia, and various islands of the Pacific and Indian Oceans The genus is abbreviated Phaius in trade journals.

Terrestrial orchid

Unlike the cattleya or familiar corsage orchid, the Phaius is a terrestrial orchid plant, which means, they grow in soil.

Moisture

Phaius require moisture at all times. Don’t try to increase humidity by wetting the foliage, as the leaves are water-sensitive and may be damaged.
On hot summer days, however, the foliage may be lightly mist-sprayed, but don’t overdo it and be sure leaves dry by evening.

Light

Required good light but direct sunlight should be avoided. The nun’s orchid will get along with a somewhat less humid atmosphere than cattleyas.

Flowering

Phaius may bloom in February, March or April. Sometime in midwinter a flower scape (or two or more) will appear from the base of the plant. Growth is fairly rapid. Individual blooms last about ten days to two weeks before deteriorating, but your plant will remain in bloom at least a month. When the last bloom fades, cut the scape off close to the bottom of the plant.

source

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phaius

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phaius_tancarvilleae

photo

http://www.orchidspecies.com/phaiustankervillii.htm
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Nun’s%20Orchid.html

klairvoyant orchids

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s